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20121104
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technology. it is a great way to make one of something, which is good. perhaps you want something that is custom just for you and you don't want something mass-produced. right now the ones you buy at home, it is qaeda militants and that sort of squeeze it out. there are other ways, there are liquid resins and powders and etc. you can go to a website and you can -- they have more expensive printers and you can get things printed in titanium. stainless steel. the quality is astounding. ge 3-d prints turbine blades for jet engines. there are some limits as to what you can do with the a 3-d printer, but not many. the question is simply how long is it going to take? it took 15 years to get from a dot matrix printer where we are now. so how long it will take for the photo-quality because i don't think it's going to be 15 years. in part because it shares the same mechanical technologies. but the interesting stuff gets into materials. right now, we can be one color and plastic. the next one, we will do two colors and plastic advocates better resolution than the maximum we will be three an
and technology. i was think of projects we could do together. i started a site called geek dad, projects on for you and for the kid. i feel constantly at getting them interested. perhaps because i'm trying so hard. one weekend, one friday at the office we got two boxes they came in in the first was a lego kit that was really cool. the go with sensors like a robot, really good and the other box was a remote control airplane. sunday will fly a plane in the park. this would be the best weekend ever. you can sort of see where this is going. saturday we dutifully put together the robot, this little three wheeled tripod and, you know, you put it together and program. a programming language i thought the kids would love it and we finally get it ready to push the button and it goes forward until it hits the wall and accept. the kids are like, you're kidding. i seen transformers. that's not a robot. i'm like okay, i've ruined robotics for children. i get it, we would have tomorrow. so go to the park tomorrow and fly a plane. go to the park and that goes right into a tree. and a worst part was whe
the mobile phone, only two technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. note elegies ever spread as rapidly. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and arguably before that it was fire so we know what mobile telephony means and smartphones and all that, but what does it mean for the majority of the worlds population? it's the communication highway. we dealt highways, communications highways into connecting people never connected before. in afghanistan attack about the story. you asked me about entrepreneurs who was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone can any. this is maybe the biggest story not invest in the last 10 years and we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access to mobile telephony and know how to read or write, were a decade ago that would affect about 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. it is a story. it's a big story. for an ordinary afghan incentive and means a lot in terms of capabilities. but what is more exciting you think when you built the railroad, there's a lot of movies made. what
stuff and cool technology, we got back to the point where we had to fly download over back.and over the battlefield to get these guys to shoot at us that we could find them because for instance the army and marine helicopters were common and they can't protect themselves against missiles in tripoli. so kind of degenerated back into that. so i talk a little bit about that. it was fine over back dad one day and i'd heard some guy from the flavor for me talking about seeing a bear. and i'm thinking he's sniffing glue or his oxygen system is contaminated or something not right. i've looked at us i saw a giraffe from across baghdad. all the wild animals were running but it shows something you don't think about, you don't expect. stuff like that is a matter. and that kind of close is on what i think is a positive note. you know, i don't like it when you read nonfiction and the writers kind of had this catharsis may bleed all over the pages and you walk away thinking that was heavy, though his deep. this is a little bit more positive. again, how i saw it and how it felt to come home from y
elegant prints and it was didn't in terms of slowing down with the camera. with 35-millimeter technology now, cannon t90, nikonf3, you can go from 3 frames to six frames a minute. this camera, you wind it like there and wind it back, you take one picture, then you have to wind it, wind it back again to take the second picture, therefore, you have to slow down and think about what you're photographing, as opposed to just starting to shoot and warm up, and then decide that you've got the certain picture or where the photographs are heading. >> for those who have never seen one of these cameras, i have it in my hand. you're talking you look down through that? >> you look down into the camera and most 35-millimeter cameras are held up to your eye and you look through them straight ahead abandon -- and with this camera, you look down into it. show it like that. >> so we put it this way. >> you're looking down into the camera. and -- >> you can't see much here. >> and there's a magnifying piece which comes up like this, which magnifies the strene you're looking at and you see through the lens,
first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and his half-brother and almost looked like the same person, you
as the chairman and ceo of the motion picture association of america. he will address how last technology has moved entertainment content to the cloud it's created economic challenges to both the industry and government protecting the rights of the 2.2 million cremators and makers in every state especially in california. and then three days later, friday october 5th, massachusetts congressman barney frank will be here for a luncheon program. i should tell you chris dodd is a 6 p.m. program also at the club in san francisco. friday october 5th, barney frank will be here for a luncheon program on the of the commonwealth club can you see both dolph and frank in one week. [laughter] congressman frank will be here discussing the domestic and foreign policy issues pertinent to the upcoming election. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new commonwealth members of this evening. you'll need the most well-informed interesting people in the bay area when you attend the commonwealth club agents all of whom are as interested as you are in savitt discussion and social interaction. now want
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
no way to know for sure. and so the technology you know, the 21st century technology is really what helps unravel this. 10 years ago i would not have have been able to write this book, not the way that it is now. >> anymore questions? we have a little bit of time left for the i just want to say too something about the book that made me think. here in texas for example looking at this history and particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know, but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas. among just regular people because as the land was given away, the mexican government giving the land away was based on how many people were in your group. so if you could ring slaves than you would get more land. and so regular people bought slaves and especially in texas. there were a lot of working-class people that came with slaves in order to enhance their land grants, so i found that to be an interesting fact about texas itself. >> kind of goes a long way. just regular people in slavery. we have a little bit more time if anyone else w
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9